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New Life for an Old Computer with a Simple Installation of Peach OSI with a Complete Guide on How to Install

 

New Life for an Old Computer

New Life for an Old Computer with a Simple Installation of Peach OSI with a Complete Guide on How to Install

Do you have an old computer lying around the house that you have not gotten around to throwing out? Don't get rid of it - install one of our Peach Distros on it instead and make that old computer run like new again. This may sound hard to do but it really is easy. It only takes about 30 to 45 minutes and it will have any older computer feeling like new again. (I suggest using only a 2003  and later computer)

Often times as a typical Windows computer ages it will become slower and slower. Think about it for a minute. Why is that? There are many reasons for this but usually it is because as the computer gets used - more and more files are added to it until those unnecessary files take up more and more space and use up those all important limited resources. As new software comes out it usually requires more memory than the older version of the same software. But the main culprit is usually the Windows operating system itself and it can take up large amounts of storage, memory and computing power. Changing over to Peach OSI is one way to get an old machine going fast again. The computer can have many uses after a version of Peach OSI is installed including setting up a home server, hosting a small website, running a HTPC ( a Home Theater PC ) or simply by having another computer to browse the web, backup files or many other things.

Caution: If you do a full Peach OSI install it will wipe your hard drive depending on the exact configuration you chose so make sure that if there are any important files on the computer they are backed up. As a matter of fact you may not need to remove your older operating system at all. During the installation process of any Peach OSI distro you are given the opportunity to setup Peach as a dual booting system - maintaining the use of your existing system and Peach will give you a simple any easy way to boot either one at startup. It's all handled with the installation of Peach OSI and during that installation you are given the option to wipe your system clean and install Peach OSI or to keep your existing system and make space available on your hard drive to install Peach OSI alongside of your older system.

What to do first? 32 bit or 64 bit?

The first thing you need to know is if the machine that you want to install Peach OSI on is 32 bit or 64 bit. One quick any easy way to know is usually by the amount of RAM that's currently installed but not always. If your computer has 4GB of RAM or less, more than likely it is a 32 bit machine. If it has over 4GB of RAM and it's OS can access more than 4GB RAM then it is most certainly a 64 bit computer. I am assuming that your computer will boot and if so you can go into your Windows OS and click on the "Start" button on the lower left and then right click on "Computer" (or "This PC" for newer machines) then click on "Properties" and a window will pop-up and on the screen there will be something that says "System Type" and after that there will be either 32 bit or 64 bit. One caveat here is that many older 64 bit computers were originally shipped with less than 4GB of RAM and with a 32 bit operating system. Finding out which you have beyond what I have already stated can be done if you know the make and model of the CPU and motherboard but let's not get into those particulars - let's just assume that you know that your current system has 4GB of RAM or less and a 32 bit operating system installed. More information on installation requirements for Peach OSI can be found here... Peach OSI System Installation Requirements.

Ok, now you know your computers architecture (32 bit or 64 bit) - what's next?

Next you need to decide which distribution of Peach OSI is right for you. We soon will have 10 different Distros - most of which are available in both 32 bit and 64 bit and more are in the planning stages. For your first try at installing Peach OSI I suggest that you select either Peach OSI's "Barebones" or Peach OSI's "The Works". Both OS's are identical accept that "The Works" has much more software already pre-installed than does "Barebones" thus it is a larger download. You can download any of our distributions from our Downloads Page. Make your selection and download the appropriate ISO for your selection. While your ISO is downloading - I recommend that you read over our FAQ page as it may answer any questions that you already have such as downloading the MD5 checksum file and how to ensure that the download that you made was downloaded correctly. This alone can save you a lot of time if your system has created a downloaded that has a corrupt ISO. You can check your ISO download that you have against the MD5 checksum before burning to DVD or USB drive. (The MD5 download is also available on the download page) For a free MD5 checksum program for Windows go here: http://www.winmd5.com/?rid=winmd5. In any Linux product simply install "GtkHash" from your software manager in order to make the same checksum hash check.

OK, now you have the Peach distribution that you wanted and you compared the MD5 checksum file and it matches, what's next?

Now you need to decide whether you want to boot the ISO on a DVD or a USB stick. (You cannot burn any Peach distribution to a CD because the ISO file is too large to fit on a CD) Again, we have an Installation Page full of a lot of pertinent installation information .We recommend that you use Yumi's Multiboot for installing the ISO to a USB drive. Yumi Multiboot is free and available here: http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/. Yumi Multiboot is a very easy program to use for burning ISO's to a USB drive. For burning the ISO to a DVD you can use any DVD burning program that you have or already know and trust but if you do not already have one for Windows here is a free download to one named Anyburn. I need to add here that installing any OS by USB stick is sometimes ten times faster than installing by DVD. If possible I always opt to boot any ISO from a USB stick.

Now that you've either burned Peach OSI to DVD or to a USB Stick - here's what to do next

Not all older computers can boot from a USB stick but most can boot from a DVD.

Booting with a DVD

Method 1 - Usually used on older computers - Boot to DVD by editing your BIOS settings.

1.) Shut down your computer and turn it back on. Press the key required to enter your BIOS or setup. This key is different on different computers. It may be the "del" key, "F10", "F2" or a different key. The screen will tell you which key to press during the BIOS Post process (the first screen that you see after turning on your computer).

 2.) Locate the boot-sequence page of the BIOS setup. Each BIOS has its own setup pages, so the name for the page may be different. Sometimes it is called "boot," other times, "drive setup." Use the arrow keys to navigate through the different menus until you locate the boot-sequence page or set of menu options for your PCs boot order.

Tip: The BIOS on most computers list the DVD boot option as DVD or Removable Devices but some confusingly might list it as a Hard Drive option, so be sure to dig around if you're having trouble finding the right one to choose. You usually can tell which one is the DVD drive if you know the manufacturer of your DVD drive.

 3.) Change the boot sequence so that DVD device is listed first. On most computers, the sequence will start with the CD/DVD drive, then the hard drive, followed by other devices. Move "DVD/Other devices" to the top of the list. Items can usually be moved around using the "+" key, but each BIOS has its own ways to move items on the list. Read the tips on the screen for information about how to move items on the list.

 4.) Press "F10" or whatever your BIOS requires to save your changes and exit BIOS. Once you exit, your computer will reboot. If you have a bootable DVD device plugged in, your computer will boot from the DVD device.
Note:  Most of the time when trying to boot to a DVD device there is no key-press prompt. The DVD boot process usually starts immediately. On some bootable devices, you may be prompted with a message to press a key before the computer will boot to the DVD drive or other DVD device. If you do nothing, your computer will check for boot information on the next boot device in the list in the BIOS which will probably be your hard drive.

Method 2 - Usually used on newer computers - Boot to your DVD drive by pressing a special key during the BIOS post process.

1.) With your computer running insert the DVD and turn off your computer.

2.) Start your computer.

3.) Access your computer's Device Boot Menu. To do so, you will need to repeatedly press a special key command as soon as you turn on the computer. This special key command varies. The very first screen in the Bios Post that you see should tell you what the special key is for boot devices - if this option is available on your computer. Typically the special key command is the F10 or F12 or the ESC key, some even the F8 key. You may have to Google your particular computer in order to find out if such a special key command is available on your computer and if so what that key is.

4.) Select the name of the DVD drive that you want to boot by using the arrow keys on your keyboard.

5.) Press the Enter key to boot up your computer from the DVD drive.

Tips & Troubleshooting

    Recheck the boot order in your BIOS . The number one reason a bootable DVD drive or other DVD device won't boot is because BIOS is not configured properly to check the DVD drive first.    

    Didn't find a "DVD Device" boot order listing in BIOS? If your computer was manufactured around 2001 or before, it may not have this ability. It may instead have a listing for a floppy drive. Any modern operating system is much too large to fit on a floppy drive. If your computer is newer, check for some other ways that the DVD option might be worded. In some really old BIOS versions, it's called "Removable Devices" or "External Devices". 

Switch to another DVD drive. If you have multiple DVD drives the BIOS - on some motherboards -  the BIOS only checks the first DVD drive. Switch the installation DVD to another DVD drive and restart your computer again. Often the first DVD drive is not the one that you expect that it is and is not the top most available DVD drive.

 

Booting with a USB Stick

Method 1 - Usually used on older computers - Boot to USB by editing your BIOS settings.

Note: Creating a bootable flash drive or configuring an external hard drive as bootable is a task in itself. Chances are that you made it to these instructions because you already know that whatever USB device that you have should be bootable after properly configuring your computer's BIOS.

        1.) Shut down your computer and turn it back on. Press the key required to enter your BIOS or setup. This key is different on different computers. It may be the "del" key, "F10" or a different key. The screen will tell you which key to press during the BIOS Post process (the first screen that you see after turning on your computer).

        2.) Locate the boot-sequence page of the BIOS setup. Each BIOS has its own setup pages, so the name for the page may be different. Sometimes it is called "boot," other times, "drive setup." Use the arrow keys to navigate through the different menus until you locate the boot-sequence page.

Tip: The BIOS on most computers list the USB boot option as USB or Removable Devices but some confusingly list it as a Hard Drive option, so be sure to dig around if you're having trouble finding the right one to choose.

        3.) Change the boot sequence so that USB device is listed first. On most computers, the sequence will start with the CD/DVD drive, then the hard drive, followed by other devices. Move "USB/Other devices" to the top of the list. Items can usually be moved around using the "+" key, but each BIOS has its own ways to move items on the list. Read the tips on the screen for information about how to move items on the list.

 4.) Press "F10" to save your changes and exit BIOS. Once you exit, your computer will reboot. If you have a bootable USB device plugged in, your computer will boot from the USB device.
Note:  Most of the time when trying to boot to a USB device there is no key-press prompt. The USB boot process usually starts immediately. On some bootable devices, you may be prompted with a message to press a key before the computer will boot to the flash drive or other USB device. If you do nothing, your computer will check for boot information on the next boot device in the list in the BIOS which will probably be your hard drive.

Method 2 - Usually used on newer computers - Boot to your USB drive by pressing a special key during the BIOS post process.

1.) Turn off your computer and insert a flash drive into an available usb port that you have pre-prepared with an operating system.

2.) Start your computer.

3.) Access your computer's Device Boot Menu. To do so, you will need to repeatedly press a special key command as soon as you turn on the computer. This special key command varies. The very first screen that you see should tell you what the key is - if this option is available on your computer. Typically the special key command is the F10 or F12 or the ESC key. You may have to Google your particle computer in order to find out if such a special key command is available on your computer and if so what that key is.

4.) Select the name of the flash drive that you want to boot by using the arrow keys on your keyboard.

5.) Press the Enter key to boot up your computer from the flash drive.

Tips & Troubleshooting

    Recheck the boot order in your BIOS . The number one reason a bootable flash drive or other USB device won't boot is because BIOS is not configured properly to check the USB ports first.    

    Didn't find a "USB Device" boot order listing in BIOS? If your computer was manufactured around 2001 or before, it may not have this ability. If your computer is newer, check for some other ways that the USB option might be worded. In some BIOS versions, it's called "Removable Devices" or "External Devices".    

    Remove other USB devices. Other connected USB devices, like printers, external media card readers, etc. could be consuming too much power, or causing some other problem which is preventing the computer from booting from flash drive or other device. Unplug all other USB devices and try again.    

    Switch to another USB port. The BIOS on some motherboards only check the first few USB ports. Switch to another USB port and restart your computer again.

 

Now you have either the DVD booting or the USB stick booting - what next.

The current Peach OSI distributions require that the Peach OS be run in live mode in order to complete the install process. Once you've booted into the installer you are presented with several options - booting live will be the top menu item that you will want to select. If you are having issues with your computer you may want to select some of the other menu options and let Peach check out your system before you continue the installation. Once " Boot Live" is selected Peach will boot itself into a complete and fully functional operating system in live mode except that because it is in live mode - no changes to the OS or data can be saved. Be patient while booting live especially if you are installing Peach OSI from a DVD because all of the files that run Peach OSI are being loaded into your computer's RAM as it reads them from the DVD or USB stick. If you have made it to the live Peach desktop congratulations, your computer should have no trouble completing the installation of Peach OSI and running it as your OS. If Peach OSI never loads to a complete desktop system then your computer may not run any modern Linux - Ubuntu based - operating system. Once you are booted live on the left area of your desktop you will see "Install" with an image of a silver DVD. Click on "Install" and the installation will begin. Basically all you have to do is to follow the onscreen instructions but we have created some Video Tutorials. for you to watch in order for you to understand the different processes that you can opt to use to install Peach OSI. There are several tutorials there that cover several different methods for installing Peach OSI such as installing Peach OSI as stand alone operating system or dual booting Peach OSI along with another operating system. Please note that the videos were created for the Peach versions dated 2014 and 2015 but they are just as applicable to our 2016 -2017+ versions and there is only some minor cosmetic differences. Enjoy and please let us know what you think of Peach OSI ...  

 

 

 

     

 

 

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